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Gilgamesh: Enough expository banter!
This talk page is used for discussing improvements to the page "Ravager (Tactics A2)". It is not the place for general discussion or sharing stories about the topic of this article.
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You do know its named after a Bastard Sword, not the word you're thinking of ~Chocobo Knight

Of course people know what they were trying to get at, but it's still funny for being a) a cross-cultural mistake and b) wrong. --77.99.30.226 11:05, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Yeah, I know, just checking. And I agree with what was stated above...it will definitely be changed for English translation! ~Chocobo Knight

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The English name is Ravager[edit source]

Screenshot here as proof: http://image.com.com/gamespot/images/2008/169/937330_20080618_screen008.jpg

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Formula?[edit source]

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Reason for name change?[edit source]

While I'm pretty sure censorship was a factor, I'm guessing it's not the entire story. It seems that, in Japanese pop culture, the word has much stronger "giant sword" connotations (the Bastard! manga, Yu-Gi-Oh's Bastard Blader card, localized as Buster Blader, Cloud's Bastard Sword, localized as Buster Sword, the Bastard / Ravager class etc.) and much weaker "scoundrel" and "secret kid from an extramarital affair" connotations, this, a name which is probably fairly intuitive and evocative to a Japanese audience would seem bizarre, ambiguous and unintuitive to an anglophone audience. TL;DR: I'm guessing it would be more accurate to say that the class was probably renamed in the English version because the name is somewhat vulgar and a different meaning and connotations in English. -- Gordon Ecker (talk) 07:17, November 14, 2012 (UTC)

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