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"Fallen Angel" is the theme of the primal Garuda from Final Fantasy XIV. It was composed by Masayoshi Soken with lyrics by members of the development team.

It opens with an organ section accompanied by a haunting chorus, and becomes increasingly faster until it suddenly stops, a female voice says "Now fall!", and a heavy guitar starts playing for a few seconds, giving way to a softer riff as the proper song begins, combining the initial chorus with faint lyrics that can be heard on the background.

LyricsEdit

Now fall!
Falling too far from the light
Deeper into the night
Lost here inside my own hell
I am a broken angel

Game appearancesEdit

Final Fantasy XIV LegacyEdit

"Fallen Angel" played against Garuda in The Howling Eye, on both difficulties.

Final Fantasy XIVEdit

"Fallen Angel" is again used in the Howling Eye. The Primals' remix is used in the The Weapon's Refrain.

Final Fantasy XVEdit

"Fallen Angel" plays in the battle against Garuda as part of the Adventurer from Another World collaboration quest.

"Fallen Angel" was in the game since day one as a track playable in the music player. It appears on the Memories of FFXIV (Disc 1) album (and is, in fact, the only song on it), purchased from the Lestallum Coernix Station.

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain CallEdit

"Fallen Angel" is a BMS challenge for Final Fantasy XIV. The song's battle arena is the Howling Eye arena from its original appearance.

Final Fantasy Record KeeperEdit

"Fallen Angel" is used as Garuda's battle theme during her encounters within the Realm Dungeons and during Final Fantasy XIV related events. It is also the battle theme used during the "Galeswept Ground" Torment Dungeon.

Live performancesEdit

The PrimalsEdit

The Primals have performed a heavy-metal remix of "Fallen Angel", which also appears on their first album.

Etymology Edit

A fallen angel is a wicked or rebellious angel that has been cast out of heaven. The term "fallen angel" does not appear in the Bible, but it is used of angels who sinned (such as those referred to in 2 Peter 2:4, "For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of gloomy darkness to be kept until the judgment ..."), of angels cast down to the earth in the War in Heaven, of Satan, demons, or of certain Watchers. The term has become popular in fictional literature regarding angels.

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